A series of weekly walking tours that travel through D.C. neighborhoods and past local historic sites. Many walks highlight the District of Columbia Heritage Trails produced by Cultural Tourism DC.

  • All walks begin at 11:00am and last two hours, except Hike the National Mall on June 4th which begins at 10:00am and lasts three hours.
  • All walks take place rain or shine.
  • Cost $20 per person unless noted (age three and younger free)
  • $5 discount with federal or military I.D.

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Abraham Lincoln's Washington


The events of Lincoln's time in the city come to life when you know where to look...
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Across the 11th Street Bridge


Learn how public parks and neighborhood heritage are attracting visitors to the communities along the Anacostia River on a walking tour featuring a trek across the 11th Street Bridge.
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Adolf Cluss in Penn Quarter


In 1862 German immigrant Adolf Cluss went into private practice as an architect and civil engineer in Washington, D.C. Over the next thirty years, he exerted far-reaching influence over the city's appearance and infrastructure.
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Urban Oasis: Anacostia Riverwalk "Yacht Clubs"


This hike along the west bank of the Anacostia River follows a segment of the Anacostia Riverwalk, a 20-mile multi-use trail stretching from Prince George's County, MD to the Tidal Basin and the National Mall in Washington, DC.
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Bloomingdale


Bloomingdale, tucked between North Capitol Street and Second Street in northeast DC, is an enclave of tree-lined streets and early twentieth-century brick row houses, many topped with conical towers and many built by the era's dominant developer Harry Wardman. Explore this neighborhood with us!
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Brookland


Brookland was originally the farm of Col. Jehial Brooks. After his death, the area developed as an early suburb northeast of downtown Washington. The neighborhood is often referred to as "Little Rome" because of the extraordinary number of Catholic institutions (large and small) that have located there.
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Capitol Hill and Eastern Market


Although the outside world may associate the term Capitol Hill solely with the U.S. Congress, those who make Washington their home conjure up a very different image: a vibrant neighborhood spread across one of the largest historic districts in the country filled with quaint row houses, leafy parks, shops and cafes, churches and schools.
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Cherry Tree Walk with Casey Trees


Join Washington Walks and Casey Trees for a walking tour recounting how Japanese cherry trees came to be planted in the District.
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Columbia Heights


The 14th Street corridor between Irving Street and Park Road was one of Washington's most important shopping and entertainment destinations outside downtown. That is, until April 4, 1968, when riots sparked extensive looting and burning of commercial property. Nearly 40 years later, change has swept the area once more.
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Congress Heights


Stay tuned for more information...
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Dumbarton Bridge Centennial


Hear the entire story of the Dumbarton Bridge during this walking tour that includes both a stroll across the beautiful bridge as well as an interior tour of gracious Dumbarton House.
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Dupont Circle


A vibrant, diverse historic district that thrives on constant activity.
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Dupont Circle (including Heurich House)


A vibrant, diverse historic district that thrives on constant activity.
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Foggy Bottom


Join us in exploring Foggy Bottom's alleys and courts and discover the neat rows of houses blue-collar workers called home as well as a pair of 19th-century churches where they worshiped.
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Georgetown Waterfront


Georgetown was originally a bustling tobacco port, a gritty place with wharves and rowdy taverns. After the Potomac River silted up, however, the tobacco trade dwindled and Georgetown's economy required a new engine to drive it. This came in the forms of mills constructed along the waterfront. You'll see what has become of them on this walk.
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Get Local


A different walk each Saturday morning that highlights D.C. neighborhoods, historic sites, and local cafes and shops.
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Hike the National Mall


Washington Walks invites D.C. residents and visitors to walk America's magnificent esplanade, the National Mall, from one end to the other - from the U.S. Capitol to the Abraham Lincoln Memorial.
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In Search of the James Creek Canal


Stay tuned for more information...
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Kalorama


Joel Barlow named the estate he purchased in 1807 Kalorama for the expansive views to be had from its place overlooking today's Rock Creek Park. No more exquisitely beautiful enclave exists in America's capital.
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Urban Oasis: Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens


This walk through far northeast D.C. travels through the quiet, settled 1950s neighborhood Eastland Gardens and past historic 1930s apartment buildings, following the eastern bank of the Anacostia River. A highlight is the Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, the only U.S. National Park devoted to aquatic plants.
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L'Enfant Plaza and the Southwest EcoDistrict


Believe it or not, L'Enfant Plaza is going to be one of the Next Big Things. But can it overcome its urban renewal-pedestrian-unfriendly design? What can we admire about this bewildering mass of ramps, pocket parks, open spaces, and mid-century architecture? The National Capital Planning Commission sees a golden opportunity.
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LeDroit Park


Walk with us as we discuss the history and evolution of Ledroit Park.
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Logan Circle


Few Washington neighborhoods have witnessed the dramatic change and breathtaking renaissance of Logan Circle, the city's only unaltered Victorian residential district. It evolved from rural obscurity to an enclave of architectural splendor, home to wealthy white and later African-American residents.
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Marching Along with John Philip Sousa


Join us to see key John Philip Sousa sites located in his hometown neighborhood of Capitol Hill and hear more about his life and times.
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National Mall Memorials: An Architect's Perspective


A professional architect's take on a selection of the capital city's famous memorials. You'll hear how controversy has always accompanied memorial-building in our democracy, and you'll see how the collective decision-making of multiple review committees has shaped what ultimately is built.
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Park View


Located adjacent to the Soldier's Home grounds and McMillan Reservoir, Park View is a leafy enclave on the heights of Northwest Washington, DC. Its proximity to the Seventh Street Turnpike (now Georgia Avenue) meant that the once rural community also hummed with activity: a beer garden and an amusement park were both once neighborhood fixtures.
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Urban Oasis: Peirce Mill


The image of Peirce Mill, a simple stone structure standing at a key transportation crossroads in Rock Creek Park, is vividly imprinted in the minds of residents of the Washington, D.C. region. Hundreds of bikers, hikers, picnickers, and bird-watchers pass it by on weekend outings, and thousands drive by during morning and evening rush hours.
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Penn Quarter


"Penn Quarter" describes downtown's Seventh Street corridor, where the 19th-century meets the 21st. Hip hotels, restaurants and loft apartments sprouted up amidst attractions like the International Spy Museum, National Portrait Gallery, Shakespeare Theatre and National Building Museum.
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Renewing Urban Renewal


"Urban renewal" originally described a progressive, well-executed approach to remaking ailing cities in the 1960s. Today it is equated with wholesale destruction of urban neighborhoods and displacement of thousands of citizens. In Washington, the epicenter for this phenomenon was a large swath of Southwest, D.C.
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Rock Creek Cemetery


Imagine setting out a picnic near the graves of your ancestors. While anathema to citizens of the twenty-first century, to those living in the nineteenth a site like Rock Creek Church Yard and Cemetery beckoned both as a refuge from city life and a bucolic setting where deceased loved ones could be remembered with al fresco repasts and strolls.
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Southwest Waterfront and Fort Leslie J. McNair


After surveying the SW Wharf work site, this walk winds its way to historic Fort Leslie J. McNair. Here participants can tour the courtroom where those involved with President Lincoln's assassination were tried and see approximately where they were executed.
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St. John's Church Lafayette Square Bicentennial


Every person who has held the office of President of the United States has attended a service at St. John's. Hear more on this walking tour that will travel through today's Lafayette Park and conclude with an interior tour of the church's sanctuary.
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Sustainable UDC


UDC has embraced its identity as a land grant university by establishing the College of Agriculture, Urban Sustainability and Environmental Science out of which the university has launched a series of initiatives aimed at making UDC a national leader in urban sustainability.
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Taste of Penn Quarter


Come along on this ambulatory nibble-and-nosh fest to D.C. phenomena that celebrates the locally grown. We'll stay on the move, serving up some of our favorite tales of gastronomic history along the way -- from the inaugural party turned food fight to Mrs. Terrell's quiet milestone in civil rights.
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U Street


Explore the neighborhood that was shared by African-American intellectuals, business leaders, and families of all economic levels. The businesses they owned and the houses they lived in are featured on this walk.
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The U.S. Capitol and Houses of Congress


The most famous building in the world and the surrounding sites.
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Walt Whitman in Washington


Join us for a walking tour identifying Walt Whitman-related sites in downtown Washington, DC.
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Washington is Burning! August 1814


A walk highlighting the bicentennial of the Battle of Bladensburg and the ensuing conflagration in the nation's capital.
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Urban Oasis: Watts Branch and Marvin Gaye Park


Watts Branch is one of two creeks running from Maryland into the Anacostia River, and has a lovely park along its entire length. We begin by finding the eastern-most boundary stone of the District of Columbia and then follow the creek through residential neighborhoods until it reaches the Anacostia River.
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Woodley Park-Washington National Cathedral


During the nineteenth century, Woodley Park, a neighborhood situated on a peak of land rising from the valley of Rock Creek, became a desirable summer retreat from the heat and bustle of the city.
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